Electronic beer bread, all the way from the edge of irony

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To participate in the sustainable food movement today is to live on the edge of irony. Especially if you’re taking part in the movement from a seriously urban setting like, say, Washington, D.C.

What do I mean by this? Just look at this summer. Over the past few months, I’ve taken digital pictures of my hands covered in garden soil, emailed for advice on thinning carrots, Googled rustic local farms, and watched a documentary about real food from a plastic seat in an air conditioned theater.

It’s not just me. Recently, more and more small farms, local food organizations, and gardeners have set up blogs or created Facebook groups. Continue reading

Disastrously Delicious: Food Writers Get Together and Shake Things Up

The following is cross-posted from The Jew & the Carrot

Ratatouille

A group of Jewish food lovers, a spread of delectable dishes, and milkshakes made of laughter. If it were possible for one afternoon to be too good, this is where it would start.

A group of Jew & the Carrot writers, editors, and friends faced the risk—overflowing goodness and all—this past Sunday. Of course, it all started with the food. I arrived at host Avigail’s Clinton Hill, Brooklyn apartment to find hand-layered ratatouille swirling from the center of a clay baking dish, crusty homemade beer bread, a cake topped with the purple velvet of baked plums, aromatic rosemary bread, peach-basil salad, and made-from-scratch yogurt. That alone nearly tipped the scales to the side of the too good. Did I mention that we washed this down with homemade sparkling ginger-grapefruit juice? Spiked with gin? Continue reading

Rainy day at the farmers’ market

Transplants2Farmers market on a rainy daywet apples

Sunday’s rain started early, and by 10 a.m., there was little doubt: this was a dismal day for outdoor activities. Yet the farmers still showed up at the farmers’ market in Takoma Park, and shoppers made it worth their while. The market on Carroll Ave. has become essential for many of us, it seems, and we’re determined to buy.

For me, it was surely worth it. I got all my important staples for the coming week (bread, greens, potatoes, apples, cider, free-range blue eggs), along with a few fun extras like garlic greens and peppercress. Luckily, aside from a soggy egg carton, everything made it home safe.

Now I have my bounty, and the knowledge that I did my small part to support local foods and sustainable growing practices. Viva la famers’ market!